WLI

About WLI

This author has not yet filled in any details.
So far WLI has created 2230 blog entries.

Cattle Current Podcast—May 10, 2021

Negotiated cash fed cattle trade was mostly inactive on very light demand in Kansas through Friday afternoon. Elsewhere, trade was at a standstill, according to the Agricultural Marketing Service.

Live prices for the week were steady to 50¢ lower in the Texas Panhandle at $117.50-$119/cwt., steady in Kansas at $119, $1-$2 lower in Nebraska at $118 and steady to $1 lower in the western Corn Belt at$118-$119. Dressed trade was $1-$2 lower in Nebraska at $188-$190 and steady to $4 lower in the western Corn Belt at $187-$190.

Feeder Cattle futures closed mostly higher Friday, but off of session highs, in the face of increasing front-month Corn futures. Live Cattle futures tagged along.

Live Cattle futures closed an average of 32¢ higher in five contracts and then unchanged to 5¢ lower

Feeder Cattle futures closed an average of 65¢ higher through the front five contracts (27¢ to $1.25 higher) and then unchanged to 27¢ lower.

Choice boxed beef cutout value was 49¢ lower at $305.88/cwt. Select was 91¢ higher at $290.27

Total estimated cattle slaughter for the week ending May 7 was 638,000 head, which was 11,000 head fewer than the previous week. Total estimated beef production of 527.3 million lbs. was 10 million lbs. less week to week.

Corn futures closed mostly 11¢ to 13¢ higher through Jly ‘22, and then mostly 2¢ to 3¢ lower.

Soybean futures closed 15¢ to 25¢ higher through May ‘22, and then mostly 9¢ to 13¢ higher.

Cattle Current Podcast—May 10, 2021 2021-05-09T16:55:37-05:00

Cattle Current Daily—May 10, 2021

Negotiated cash fed cattle trade was mostly inactive on very light demand in Kansas through Friday afternoon. Elsewhere, trade was at a standstill, according to the Agricultural Marketing Service.

Live prices for the week were steady to 50¢ lower in the Texas Panhandle at $117.50-$119/cwt., steady in Kansas at $119, $1-$2 lower in Nebraska at $118 and steady to $1 lower in the western Corn Belt at$118-$119. Dressed trade was $1-$2 lower in Nebraska at $188-$190 and steady to $4 lower in the western Corn Belt at $187-$190.

Feeder Cattle futures closed mostly higher Friday, but off of session highs, in the face of increasing front-month Corn futures. Live Cattle futures tagged along.

Live Cattle futures closed an average of 32¢ higher in five contracts and then unchanged to 5¢ lower

Feeder Cattle futures closed an average of 65¢ higher through the front five contracts (27¢ to $1.25 higher) and then unchanged to 27¢ lower.

Choice boxed beef cutout value was 49¢ lower at $305.88/cwt. Select was 91¢ higher at $290.27

Total estimated cattle slaughter for the week ending May 7 was 638,000 head, which was 11,000 head fewer than the previous week. Total estimated beef production of 527.3 million lbs. was 10 million lbs. less week to week.

Corn futures closed mostly 11¢ to 13¢ higher through Jly ‘22, and then mostly 2¢ to 3¢ lower.

Soybean futures closed 15¢ to 25¢ higher through May ‘22, and then mostly 9¢ to 13¢ higher.

*******************************

Major U.S. financial indices closed higher Friday, amid one of those frequent non-intuitive paradoxes. Presumably, much of the support stemmed from investors betting the Federal Reserve will maintain dovish monetary policy longer, due to April employment numbers falling far short of expectations.

Total non-farm payroll employment increased 266,000 in April, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Various reports pegged pre-report estimates at closer to 1 million.

Average hourly earnings for all employees on private non-farm payrolls were $30.17 in April, up 21¢ from the previous month.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed 229 points higher. The S&P 500 was up closed 30 points higher. The NASDAQ was up 119 points.

*****************************

“Timely rains remain critical to being able to stock cattle through the summer,” say analysts with the Livestock Marketing Information Center (LMIC). “ Drought continues to intensify across the U.S. and is looking dismal in key areas.  The Western half of the U.S. is in the worst stages of drought (65%-D0-D4, 47% D3-D4), a situation that has persisted since last year and is escalating.”

As noted in Cattle Current last week, USDA’s first seasonal assessment ranked just 22% of the nation’s pasture and range as Good or Excellent, versus 46% at the same time last year. Conversely, 47% was rated as Poor or Very Poor, compared to 16% a year earlier.

“One of the newer developments in the Drought Monitor has been the spread of dryness across the Corn Belt,” say LMIC analysts, in the latest Livestock Monitor.  The Drought Monitor indicates that 44% of this region is in some level of drought. Dryness is less of a concern when planting, and typically means faster acres planted…The problem is more about soil moisture and growing phases which can affect crop yields.”

Based on USDA’s Crop Progress report last week, LMIC analysts point out top soil moisture conditions are rated as Short or Very short across 37% of cropland in the continental U.S. About 55% of cropland is reporting adequate moisture compared to 65% in 2020

“These figures are worrisome but with most of the growing season ahead of us, it’s early to be calling for yield declines just yet,” say LMIC analysts.

Cattle Current Daily—May 10, 2021 2021-05-09T16:53:29-05:00

Cattle Current Podcast—May 7, 2021

Negotiated cash fed cattle trade was slow on light demand in Kansas through Thursday afternoon. Live prices were steady with the previous day at $119/cwt., according to the Agricultural Marketing Service.

Elsewhere, trade was limited on light demand with too few transactions to trend.

Earlier in the week, live prices were at $117.50 to $119.00 in the Texas Panhandle, at $118 in Nebraska and at $118 to $119 in the western Corn Belt. Dressed prices were at $187 to $190. Live prices in Colorado last week were at $119-$120.

Feeder Cattle futures gave back everything gained in the previous session as corn prices surged higher yet again on Thursday. Live Cattle futures extended modest gains, supported by blooming wholesale beef values and a sizable gain in open interest the previous day.

Live Cattle futures closed an average of 66¢ higher.

Feeder Cattle futures closed an average of $2.02 lower.

Choice boxed beef cutout value was $1.59 higher Thursday afternoon  at $306.37/cwt. Select was $3.18 higher at $289.36

The average dressed steer weighing for the week ending Apr. 24 was 896 lbs., according to USDA’s Actual Slaughter Under Federal Inspection report. That was 2 lbs. lighter than the previous week. The average dressed heifer weight of 825 lbs. was 12 lbs. lighter. Beef production was 16.9 million lbs. at 547.4 million lbs.

Corn futures closed 10¢ to 20¢ higher from Jly ‘21 to Jly ‘22, mostly 6¢ to 8¢ higher in other contracts.

Soybean futures closed 20¢ to 28¢ higher through Mar ‘22, and then mostly 11¢ to 13¢ higher.

Cattle Current Podcast—May 7, 2021 2021-05-06T20:42:04-05:00

Cattle Current Daily—May 7, 2021

Negotiated cash fed cattle trade was slow on light demand in Kansas through Thursday afternoon. Live prices were steady with the previous day at $119/cwt., according to the Agricultural Marketing Service.

Elsewhere, trade was limited on light demand with too few transactions to trend.

Earlier in the week, live prices were at $117.50 to $119.00 in the Texas Panhandle, at $118 in Nebraska and at $118 to $119 in the western Corn Belt. Dressed prices were at $187 to $190. Live prices in Colorado last week were at $119-$120.

Feeder Cattle futures gave back everything gained in the previous session as corn prices surged higher yet again on Thursday. Live Cattle futures extended modest gains, supported by blooming wholesale beef values and a sizable gain in open interest the previous day.

Live Cattle futures closed an average of 66¢ higher.

Feeder Cattle futures closed an average of $2.02 lower.

Choice boxed beef cutout value was $1.59 higher Thursday afternoon  at $306.37/cwt. Select was $3.18 higher at $289.36

The average dressed steer weighing for the week ending Apr. 24 was 896 lbs., according to USDA’s Actual Slaughter Under Federal Inspection report. That was 2 lbs. lighter than the previous week. The average dressed heifer weight of 825 lbs. was 12 lbs. lighter. Beef production was 16.9 million lbs. at 547.4 million lbs.

Corn futures closed 10¢ to 20¢ higher from Jly ‘21 to Jly ‘22, mostly 6¢ to 8¢ higher in other contracts.

Soybean futures closed 20¢ to 28¢ higher through Mar ‘22, and then mostly 11¢ to 13¢ higher.

******************************

Major U.S. financial indices closed higher Thursday, apparently buoyed by the previous day’s bullish ADP®National Employment ReportTM, and betting on similar results in the government’s employment situation summary due out Friday.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed 318 points higher. The S&P 500 closed 34 points higher. The NASDAQ was up 50 points.

*****************************

U.S. beef exports surged in March, with volume up 8% year over year, the second most in the post-BSE era, according to data released by USDA and compiled by the U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF).

Beef exports totaled 124,808 metric tons (mt) in March. Export value for the month exceeded $800 million for the first time at $801.9 million, up 14% year-over-year. Beef muscle cut exports set new monthly records for both volume (98,986 mt, up 13% from a year ago) and value ($718.3 million, up 17%). For the first quarter, beef exports pulled even with last year’s pace at 333,348 mt, valued at $2.12 billion. For beef muscle cuts, first quarter exports increased 4% to 262,914 mt, valued at $1.9 billion (up 5%).

March highlights for U.S. beef included record exports to China, Honduras and the Philippines.

March pork exports were record-large at 294,724 mt, up 1% from last year’s strong total, setting a new value record at $794.9 million (up 4%).

“It’s very gratifying to see such an outstanding breakout month for U.S. beef and pork exports,” says Dan Halstrom, USMEF President and CEO. “Exports were off to a respectable start in 2021, considering the logistical and labor challenges the industry is facing and ongoing restrictions on the foodservice sector in many key markets. While these obstacles are not totally behind us, the March results show the situation is improving and the export totals better reflect the strong level of global demand for U.S. red meat.”

Muscle cuts drove March export growth, but Halstrom is also encouraged by a rebound in shipments of beef and pork variety meat.

“The tight labor situation at the plant level has been especially hard on variety meat volumes,” Halstrom explains. “But March variety meat exports matched last year’s performance for pork and were the largest of 2021 on the beef side. It’s important that the capture rate for variety meat continues to improve, as this is a critical component of the export product mix.”

Cattle Current Daily—May 7, 2021 2021-05-06T20:39:47-05:00

Cattle Current Podcast—May 6, 2021

Negotiated cash fed cattle trade ranged from a standstill to mostly limited on light demand in all major cattle feeding regions through Wednesday afternoon, according to the Agricultural Marketing Service.

So far this week, live prices in Nebraska are $1-$2 lower than last week at $118/cwt. Dressed prices are $1-$2 lower at $188-$190.

Live prices in the western Corn Belt this week are steady to $2 lower at $118-$119. Dressed prices are steady to $4 lower at $187-$190.

Last week, live prices were at $118-$119 in the Southern Plains and at $119-$120 in Colorado.

Cattle feeders offered 1,906 head (12 lots) in Central Stockyards’ weekly Fed Cattle Exchange auction. Of those, 1,091 head (6 lots) sold for mostly $118.50 to $119/cwt., steady with the previous week’s country trade.

At Sioux Falls Regional in South Dakota, fat steers and heifers sold $3-$5 lower. There were 223 Choice 2-3 steers weighing an average of 1,433 lbs., bringing an average of $115.97/cwt., which was $2-$3 lower than established country trade.

Cattle futures found some footing on Wednesday, helped along by technical support and oversold conditions.

Live Cattle futures closed an average of $1.44 higher.

Feeder Cattle futures closed an average of $1.86 higher.

Choice boxed beef cutout value was $3.56 higher Wednesday afternoon at $304.78/cwt. Select was $2.27 higher at $286.18

Corn futures closed 20¢ to 24¢ higher from near Sep to Jly ‘22, mostly 5¢ to 7¢ higher in other contracts.

Soybean futures closed mostly 15¢ to 19¢ higher, except for 4¢ to 9¢ higher in the front three contracts.

Cattle Current Podcast—May 6, 2021 2021-05-05T19:14:49-05:00

Cattle Current Daily—May 6, 2021

Negotiated cash fed cattle trade ranged from a standstill to mostly limited on light demand in all major cattle feeding regions through Wednesday afternoon, according to the Agricultural Marketing Service.

So far this week, live prices in Nebraska are $1-$2 lower than last week at $118/cwt. Dressed prices are $1-$2 lower at $188-$190.

Live prices in the western Corn Belt this week are steady to $2 lower at $118-$119. Dressed prices are steady to $4 lower at $187-$190.

Last week, live prices were at $118-$119 in the Southern Plains and at $119-$120 in Colorado.

Cattle feeders offered 1,906 head (12 lots) in Central Stockyards’ weekly Fed Cattle Exchange auction. Of those, 1,091 head (6 lots) sold for mostly $118.50 to $119/cwt., steady with the previous week’s country trade.

At Sioux Falls Regional in South Dakota, fat steers and heifers sold $3-$5 lower. There were 223 Choice 2-3 steers weighing an average of 1,433 lbs., bringing an average of $115.97/cwt., which was $2-$3 lower than established country trade.

Cattle futures found some footing on Wednesday, helped along by technical support and oversold conditions.

Live Cattle futures closed an average of $1.44 higher.

Feeder Cattle futures closed an average of $1.86 higher.

Choice boxed beef cutout value was $3.56 higher Wednesday afternoon at $304.78/cwt. Select was $2.27 higher at $286.18

Corn futures closed 20¢ to 24¢ higher from near Sep to Jly ‘22, mostly 5¢ to 7¢ higher in other contracts.

Soybean futures closed mostly 15¢ to 19¢ higher, except for 4¢ to 9¢ higher in the front three contracts.

******************************

Major U.S. financial indices closed narrowly mixed Wednesday. Support included positive quarterly corporate earnings reports from the likes of GM. Employment data suggested more optimism, as well.

Private sector employment increased by 742,000 jobs from March to April according to the April ADP® National Employment ReportTM. That was more than the trade expected.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed 97 points higher. The S&P 500 closed 2 points higher. The NASDAQ was down 51 points.

*****************************

Declining cattle futures reflect the market realities cash prices first followed, says Stephen Koontz, agricultural economist at Colorado State University, in the latest issue of In the Cattle Markets.

“Optimism from late winter and early spring is being replaced by realism that: it is going to take another two to three months to work through the large front-loaded fed animal inventories; fed animal slaughter is at capacity; costs of gain are now substantially higher than the past several years,” Koontz explains.

As noted recently in Cattle Current, larger than expected ready fed cattle supplies stem from lingering pandemic impacts, as well as the February winter storm that disrupted supply chains. Concurrently, packing capacity remains less than before the pandemic.

“Combined fed steer and heifer slaughter has been just short of 525,000 head per week. It is likely that this is a reasonable maximum that the packing industry can process,” Koontz says. “Packer margins are strong but there is little incentive to pay more for fed cattle when plants are operating six days per week. There is little to no possibility to process more cattle, regardless of the incentive to do so. There are a lot of historical relationships that are irrelevant when the packing industry is essentially at capacity.”

Based on the latest Cattle on Feed report, he says the number of cattle on feed more than 120 days and more than 150 days declined, suggesting some progress in reducing market-ready fed cattle supplies. But, Koontz says supplies will likely be abundant into late summer.

As for increasing feed costs, Koontz points out Corn futures increased $2/bu. from August of last year to mid-January this year and then tacked on another $1.50 since the end of March. He notes the formula cost of gain for fed cattle this summer is well beyond $1/lb.

“If live cattle have little upside and the corn market continues to ration old crop, then it is feeder cattle that have to adjust,” Koontz says.

Cattle Current Daily—May 6, 2021 2021-05-05T19:12:34-05:00

Cattle Current Podcast—May 5, 2021

Negotiated cash fed cattle trade was light to moderate on moderate demand in Nebraska through Tuesday afternoon. Live prices were steady to 50¢ higher than the previous day at $118/cwt., which was $1-$2 lower than last week. Dressed prices were $1-$2 lower at $188-$190.

Trade in the western Corn Belt was light to moderate on moderate demand. Live prices were steady to $3 lower than last week at $117-$119. There were a few dressed trades at $187-$190, but too few to trend; $190-$191 last week.

Elsewhere, trade was limited on light demand. Live prices in the Southern Plains last week were at $118-$119. Prices in Colorado last week were $119-$120.

Choice boxed beef cutout value was $1.92 higher at $301.22/cwt. Select was 12¢ higher at $283.91

Feeder Cattle futures and front-month Live Cattle wilted Tuesday, pressured by higher feed costs and plentiful fed cattle supplies.

Live Cattle futures closed an average of 82¢ lower across a broad range, from an average of $1.52 lower in the front four contracts to an average of 26¢ lower across the rest of the board.

Feeder Cattle futures closed an average of $3.26 lower.

Grain futures popped higher Tuesday as the market continues trying to buy more acres. That was despite what appeared to be a production-friendly planting report.

Corn futures closed mostly 13¢ to 18¢ higher.

Soybean futures closed mostly 12¢ to 18¢ higher.

Cattle Current Podcast—May 5, 2021 2021-05-04T19:15:53-05:00

Cattle Current Daily—May 5, 2021

Negotiated cash fed cattle trade was light to moderate on moderate demand in Nebraska through Tuesday afternoon. Live prices were steady to 50¢ higher than the previous day at $118/cwt., which was $1-$2 lower than last week. Dressed prices were $1-$2 lower at $188-$190.

Trade in the western Corn Belt was light to moderate on moderate demand. Live prices were steady to $3 lower than last week at $117-$119. There were a few dressed trades at $187-$190, but too few to trend; $190-$191 last week.

Elsewhere, trade was limited on light demand. Live prices in the Southern Plains last week were at $118-$119. Prices in Colorado last week were $119-$120.

Choice boxed beef cutout value was $1.92 higher at $301.22/cwt. Select was 12¢ higher at $283.91

Feeder Cattle futures and front-month Live Cattle wilted Tuesday, pressured by higher feed costs and plentiful fed cattle supplies.

Live Cattle futures closed an average of 82¢ lower across a broad range, from an average of $1.52 lower in the front four contracts to an average of 26¢ lower across the rest of the board.

Feeder Cattle futures closed an average of $3.26 lower.

Grain futures popped higher Tuesday as the market continues trying to buy more acres. That was despite what appeared to be a production-friendly planting report.

Corn futures closed mostly 13¢ to 18¢ higher.

Soybean futures closed mostly 12¢ to 18¢ higher.

******************************

Major U.S. financial indices closed mixed to mainly lower Tuesday. Investor jitters seemed centered around inflation fears. On the one hand, pandemic supply chain disruptions, in tandem with economic reopening are driving up input costs. On the other, there’s concern the Federal Reserve will be forced to raise interest rates and slow monetary easing faster than previously suggested.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed 19 points higher. The S&P 500 closed 28 points lower. The NASDAQ was down 261 points.

*****************************

Agricultural producers grew more optimistic about the future last month, according to the Purdue University/CME Group Ag Economy Barometer. Month to month, the Index of Future Expectations increased 5 points to 169.

“The strength in commodity prices continues to drive improving expectations for strong financial performance, even as many are seeing rising input costs,” says James Mintert, the barometer’s principal investigator and director of Purdue University’s Center for Commercial Agriculture.

At the same time, agricultural producers lost some confidence in existing circumstances. The Index of Current Conditions dropped 7 points in April, to a reading of 195.

“The difference in producers’ short-term versus long-term expectations could be an indication they are concerned that the rapid rise in farmland values we’re seeing may not be sustainable over the long run,” Mintert says.

Even so, ranchers and farmers expect farmland values to continue rising over the next year. The Short-Run Farmland Value Expectations Index rose to a record high reading of 159, which was 11 points higher than the previous month. Further out, producers were less optimistic. The Long-Term Farmland Values Expectations Index (looking five years ahead) declined 9 points in April to a reading of 148.

Overall, the Ag Economy Barometer was virtually unchanged, up one point from March to a reading of 178. It’s calculated each month from 400 U.S. agricultural producers’ responses to a telephone survey. The current survey was conducted April 19 to 23.

Cattle Current Daily—May 5, 2021 2021-05-04T19:12:50-05:00

Cattle Current Podcast—May 4, 2021

Negotiated cash fed cattle trade was limited on light demand in Nebraska through Monday afternoon. There were a few live trades at $117.50 to $118.00/cwt. but too few to trend. Elsewhere, trade ranged from mostly inactive on light demand to a standstill, according to the Agricultural Marketing Service.

The average five-area direct fed steer price last week was $118.89/cwt. on a live basis, which was $2.47 less than the previous week. The average steer price in the beef was $1.67 less at $190.44.

Cattle futures managed to fade stronger pressure early to close mixed on Monday with most of the pressure in nearby contracts.

Live Cattle futures closed an average of 23¢ higher, except for $1.27 and 27¢ lower in the front two contracts.

Feeder Cattle futures closed an average of 69¢ higher (5¢ to $1.40 higher), except for an average of 27¢ lower in three contracts.

Choice boxed beef cutout value was $2.80 higher Monday afternoon at $299.30/cwt. Select was 74¢ higher at $283.

Corn futures closed mixed; mostly fractionally lower to 2¢ higher, except for 7¢ lower and 6¢ higher in the front two contracts.

Soybean futures closed 4¢ to 10¢ lower through the front three contracts, then mostly 2¢ to 5¢ higher through Aug ’22; mostly fractionally lower across the rest of the board.

Cattle Current Podcast—May 4, 2021 2021-05-03T21:15:23-05:00

Cattle Current Daily—May 4, 2021

Negotiated cash fed cattle trade was limited on light demand in Nebraska through Monday afternoon. There were a few live trades at $117.50 to $118.00/cwt. but too few to trend. Elsewhere, trade ranged from mostly inactive on light demand to a standstill, according to the Agricultural Marketing Service.

The average five-area direct fed steer price last week was $118.89/cwt. on a live basis, which was $2.47 less than the previous week. The average steer price in the beef was $1.67 less at $190.44.

Cattle futures managed to fade stronger pressure early to close mixed on Monday with most of the pressure in nearby contracts.

Live Cattle futures closed an average of 23¢ higher, except for $1.27 and 27¢ lower in the front two contracts.

Feeder Cattle futures closed an average of 69¢ higher (5¢ to $1.40 higher), except for an average of 27¢ lower in three contracts.

Choice boxed beef cutout value was $2.80 higher Monday afternoon at $299.30/cwt. Select was 74¢ higher at $283.

Corn futures closed mixed; mostly fractionally lower to 2¢ higher, except for 7¢ lower and 6¢ higher in the front two contracts.

Soybean futures closed 4¢ to 10¢ lower through the front three contracts, then mostly 2¢ to 5¢ higher through Aug ’22; mostly fractionally lower across the rest of the board.

******************************

Major U.S. financial indices closed mostly higher Monday, buoyed by continued progress in COVID-19 vaccinations and easing health restrictions.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed 238 points higher. The S&P 500 closed 11 points higher. The NASDAQ was down 67 points.

*****************************

“Overall cattle market conditions are still expected to improve year over year in the second half of the year. However, current challenges are somewhat more severe and taking longer to clear than earlier expected. Market conditions are very dynamic now and the next few weeks may determine the tone of markets for the remainder of the year,” says Derrell Peel, Extension livestock marketing specialist at Oklahoma State University.

In his weekly market comments, Peel explains ample supplies are pressuring fed cattle prices as feedlots struggle to get more current.

“On the other end, feeder cattle are being squeezed between a stagnant fed market and rising feed prices. The pressure is weighing on feeder cattle markets with both cash feeder cattle prices and feeder futures moving lower in April,” Peel says.

As well, drought continues to deepen. Peel notes the Drought Severity and Coverage Index (DSCI) is at 180 for the U.S., the highest ever for April or May. He points out hay prices are increasing, too. The national average price for other hay in March was $142/ton versus $134 a year earlier. March prices for alfalfa were $181/ton compared to $172 the previous year.

‘There are indications that beef cow liquidation is accelerating,” Peel says. “March monthly beef cow slaughter was up 10.2% year over year. Beef cow slaughter in April is increasing but is difficult to interpret compared to pandemic-disrupted levels one year ago.”

Cattle Current Daily—May 4, 2021 2021-05-03T21:13:31-05:00

This Is A Custom Widget

This Sliding Bar can be switched on or off in theme options, and can take any widget you throw at it or even fill it with your custom HTML Code. Its perfect for grabbing the attention of your viewers. Choose between 1, 2, 3 or 4 columns, set the background color, widget divider color, activate transparency, a top border or fully disable it on desktop and mobile.

This Is A Custom Widget

This Sliding Bar can be switched on or off in theme options, and can take any widget you throw at it or even fill it with your custom HTML Code. Its perfect for grabbing the attention of your viewers. Choose between 1, 2, 3 or 4 columns, set the background color, widget divider color, activate transparency, a top border or fully disable it on desktop and mobile.

This Is A Custom Widget

This Sliding Bar can be switched on or off in theme options, and can take any widget you throw at it or even fill it with your custom HTML Code. Its perfect for grabbing the attention of your viewers. Choose between 1, 2, 3 or 4 columns, set the background color, widget divider color, activate transparency, a top border or fully disable it on desktop and mobile.

This Is A Custom Widget

This Sliding Bar can be switched on or off in theme options, and can take any widget you throw at it or even fill it with your custom HTML Code. Its perfect for grabbing the attention of your viewers. Choose between 1, 2, 3 or 4 columns, set the background color, widget divider color, activate transparency, a top border or fully disable it on desktop and mobile.