Daily Market Highlights

Cattle Current Daily—May 6, 2019

Negotiated cash fed cattle prices were sharply lower last week. Live trade was $3-$4 lower at $122-$123/cwt. in the Southern Plains; mostly $124 in Nebraska and $123-$127 in the western Corn Belt. Dressed trade was mainly $4-$6 lower at mostly $200.

Feeder Cattle futures continued to lead Live Cattle lower on Friday. Declining wholesale values at a time seasonality suggests a boost from grilling demand, as well as the continued unwinding of long-held long positions continue to weigh.

Except for 25¢ and 42¢ lower at either end of the board, Live Cattle futures closed an average of $1.10 lower. From the previous Friday through Thursday, open interest declined by 14,124 contracts.

Feeder Cattle futures closed an average of $1.30 lower.

Wholesale beef values were lower on light demand and moderate offerings, according to the Agricultural Marketing Service.

Choice boxed beef cutout value was $1.44 lower Friday afternoon at $227.36/cwt. Select was $1.79 lower at $213.29.

Except for 1¢ higher in spot May, Corn futures closed mainly fractionally mixed.

Soybean futures closed 1¢ lower to 1¢ higher, except for 4¢ higher in the back three contracts.

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Major U.S. financial indices bounced back Friday, fueled by the monthly national employment report.

Total non-farm payroll employment increased 263,000 in April, compared to the previous month, according to the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics. The unemployment rate declined 0.2% to 3.6%, the lowest rate since 1969.

In April, average hourly earnings for all employees on private non-farm payrolls rose by 6¢ cents to $27.77. Over the year, average hourly earnings have increased by 3.2%.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed 197 points higher. The S&P 500 closed 28 points higher. The NASDAQ was up 127 points.

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The clock is ticking, but there’s still time for producers to get corn in the ground without impairing yield.

For instance, Bill Wiebold, agronomist with the University of Missouri (MU) Extension Service explains, “Our data provide some optimism that reasonably high yield can be obtained when corn is planted in mid-to-late May. However, yield potential is very strongly dependent on weather conditions in summer. For this reason, it is difficult to predict in any specific year what will happen to corn yield if planting is delayed.”

According to a 5-year MU study, yield potential in the state declines when corn planting is delayed through the first three weeks of May: -5% by the first week of May; -20% by the end of the month; -40% by the end of June.

Likewise, University of Minnesota studies show that corn yield is typically maximized when planting occurs from late April through mid-May.

“Minnesota corn growers have achieved good yields in the past several years even when the average corn planting date (50% of the corn planted in the state) has been April 29 for the years 2014-2016 and May 7 in 2017,” according to Minnesota Crop News.

“…in central Iowa from 2014-2016, the highest yield potential was attained with early May planting dates. Planting in mid-April resulted in 95% yield potential and planting in early June resulted in 81% yield potential,” according to Iowa State University.

By the way, according to the Iowa Farm Bureau, farmers in that state can plant up to 1.4 million acres in a day; more than 60% of the crop in a week.

USDA’s monthly World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates are due out Thursday.

Cattle Current Daily—May 6, 2019 2019-05-04T17:01:41-05:00

Cattle Current Daily—May 3, 2019

“Lower cash sales of fed cattle combined with the downward trending futures is causing much uncertainty among cattle feeders,” noted the AMS reporter on hand for Thursday’s sale at Mitchell Livestock Auction in South Dakota.

Apparently, technical pressure, borne by recent bearishness was behind the hard drop in Feeder Cattle futures, which pressured Live Cattle in turn. It didn’t help that early support in Lean Hog futures faded through the session.

Net U.S. pork sales for Apr. 19-25 of 16,100 metric tons (mt) were 4% less than the previous week and 59% less than the prior four-week average, according to the Weekly Export Sales report from USDA’s Foreign Agricultural Service.

Beef exports continued softer, as well. Net export sales of U.S. beef (10,600 mt) were down 54% from the previous week and 50% lower than the prior four-week average.

Except for 20¢ lower in spot Jun, Live Cattle futures closed an average of 96¢ lower.

Feeder Cattle futures closed an average of $1.99 lower.

Wholesale beef values were lower on Choice and sharply lower on Select with light to moderate demand and offerings, according to the Agricultural Marketing Service.

Choice boxed beef cutout value was $1.42 lower Thursday afternoon at $228.80/cwt. Select was $2.42 lower at $215.08.

Corn futures closed fractionally higher to 2¢ higher through near Dec and then fractionally lower to 3¢ lower.

Soybean futures closed mostly 7¢-8¢ lower.

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Major U.S. financial indices closed lower again on Thursday, with follow-through pressure from the Fed’s decision to leave the federal funds rate unchanged on Wednesday.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed 122 points lower. The S&P 500 closed 6 points lower. The NASDAQ was down 12 points.

Incidentally, Beyond Meat, Inc. (NASDAQ:BYND)—a plant-based fake meat company—went public, launching its IPO Thursday at $25 per share. The price soared to $65.75 by the close of the day.

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Demand for speed and convenience continue to shift consumer eating patterns, according to two recent reports from the NPD Group (NPD).

For instance, consumers are including frozen foods in 2% more at-home meals than a decade ago—9.8 billion at-home eating occasions last year.

“Demographic shifts, like Millennials moving into the busiest times of their lives juggling spouses, kids, and a career, are fueling a greater need for the convenience that frozen foods offer,” says David Portalatin, NPD Food Industry Advisor and author of Eating Patterns in America. “Manufacturers are also doing their part in increasing interest in frozen foods by innovating around contemporary food values and emerging flavor trends to provide convenience.”

Likewise, the fast casual restaurant category continues to grow. The definition of fast casual varies, but tends to include restaurants such as Five Guys, Shake Shack and even Starbucks.

Specifically, the number of fast casual chain restaurants rose by 1% to 25,312 total units, based on NPD’s Fall 2018 ReCount® restaurant census, which includes restaurants open as of September 30, 2018. In the year ending February 2019, compared to a year earlier, fast casual customers increased their visits by 3%, while the total quick service restaurant category, under which the fast casual category falls, were up 1%; total U.S.  foodservice traffic remained flat.

The fast casual category is still a relatively small part of the total foodservice industry, according to NPD. Fast casual restaurants represent 8% of total quick service visits, whereas traditional quick service restaurants, represent 75% of traffic.

Cattle Current Daily—May 3, 2019 2019-05-02T19:00:20-05:00

Cattle Current Daily—May 2, 2019

Through Wednesday afternoon, negotiated cash fed cattle prices were mostly $1-$4 lower than last week on a live basis at: $124/cwt. in Nebraska; $122 in Kansas; $125-$126 in the western Corn Belt. Dressed trade was $4-$6 lower at mostly $200.

There were 837 head offered in the weekly Fed Cattle Exchange auction; 479 head (four lots) sold for a weighted average price of $122.15/cwt., for delivery at 1-9 days.

A rally in Lean Hog futures helped stem the degree of bleeding in Cattle futures Wednesday.

Except for $1.82 higher in the back contract, Live Cattle futures closed an average of 42¢ lower.

Except for 7¢ higher in Aug, Feeder Cattle futures closed an average of 37¢ lower.

Wholesale beef values were weak to lower on light demand and moderate offerings, according to the Agricultural Marketing Service.

Choice boxed beef cutout value was $1.62 lower Wednesday afternoon at $230.22/cwt. Select was 71¢ lower at $217.50.

Corn futures closed 3¢-6¢ higher through May ’20 and then mostly 2¢ higher. Presumably, some of the bounce came from weather-delayed planting.

Soybean futures closed 1¢-3¢ lower, extending losses as traders look for wet conditions to ultimately bring in more corn acres.

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Major U.S. financial indices closed lower on Wednesday. Much of the pressure was attributed to the Fed standing pat on interest rates. Apparently, traders were looking for a rate cut, given ongoing sub-2% inflation.

“Information received since the Federal Open Market Committee met in March indicates that the labor market remains strong and that economic activity rose at a solid rate. Job gains have been solid, on average, in recent months, and the unemployment rate has remained low,” according to an FOMC statement. “Growth of household spending and business fixed investment slowed in the first quarter. On a 12-month basis, overall inflation and inflation for items other than food and energy have declined and are running below 2%. On balance, market-based measures of inflation compensation have remained low in recent months, and survey-based measures of longer-term inflation expectations are little changed.”

Pressure came despite the closely watched ADP Employment Report shattering expectations to the upside. That report indicates non-farm, private sector employment increased by 275,000 in April.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed 162 points lower. The S&P 500 closed 22 points lower. The NASDAQ was down 45 points.

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Dairy cattle continue to be a significant contributor to the commercial U.S. beef supply, say Brenda Boetel, Extension economist and Jared Geiser, research assistant from the University of Wisconsin-River Falls.

“Despite growing beef cattle inventories since 2014, dairy animals have been a stable source of beef and continue to play a key role in filling U.S. beef demand,” explain Boetel and Geiser, in the latest issue of In the Cattle Markets. “In 2018 the dairy sector contributed 5.6 billion lbs. (21.0 %) of beef to the U.S.”

For perspective, they point out total U.S. commercial beef production last year was 26.9 billion lbs., the most since 2002. Beef production between 2002 and 2018 ranged from 23.7 billion lbs. in 2014 to 27.0 billion lbs. in 2002, with dairy animals contributing 22% in 2014 and 18% in 2002.

“The contribution from dairy cattle varies based on the size of the native cattle herd and its contribution to the beef supply, as well as the number of cull dairy cows,” Geiser and Boetel explain. “Finished dairy steers are the largest beef contributor from the dairy industry followed by cull cows and finished heifers.”

Cattle Current Daily—May 2, 2019 2019-05-01T18:10:06-05:00

Cattle Current Daily—May 1, 2019

There were too few transactions to trend, but early negotiated cash fed cattle prices were sharply lower at $123/cwt. in Kansas on a live basis at $200 dressed in Nebraska.

Cattle futures continued to slide as traders closed out the books for the month and open interest continued to erode.

Live Cattle futures closed an average of 82¢ lower.

Feeder Cattle futures closed an average of $1.77 lower.

Wholesale beef values were lower on Choice and firm on Select with light to moderate demand and offerings, according to the Agricultural Marketing Service.

Choice boxed beef cutout value was $1.30 lower Tuesday afternoon at $231.84/cwt. Select was 49¢ higher at $218.21.

Corn futures closed mainly fractionally mixed.

Soybean futures continued to slide, closing 4¢-6¢ lower.

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Major U.S. financial indices closed mixed on Tuesday. Pressure included less earnings than expected from Google’s owner, Alphabet. Support included chatter about headway in trade talks with China.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed 38 points higher. The S&P 500 closed 2 points higher. The NASDAQ was down 54 points.

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Stronger same-store sales and customer traffic levels pushed the National Restaurant Association’s Restaurant Performance Index (RPI) 0.9% higher in March, compared to the previous month. The monthly composite index was 101.9 in March. It tracks the health and outlook for the U.S. restaurant industry. 

Sub-indices of the RPI were higher, as well. The Current Situation Index increased 1.5% to 101.8. It declined the previous three months.

The Expectations Index increased 0.3% to 102.1. “March represented the fourth consecutive increase in the Expectations Index, which propelled the forward-looking component to its highest level in 11 months,” according to the RPI report.

Index values above 100 signal a period of expansion. Values below 100 signal a period of contraction.

Cattle Current Daily—May 1, 2019 2019-04-30T18:35:10-05:00

Cattle Current Daily—Apr. 30, 2019

Early two-sided trading in Cattle futures gave way to continued pressure from last week, tied to volatility in Lean Hog futures, technicals and growing pessimism about increasing fed cattle supplies during a time that domestic demand appears static, while international demand is a bit softer year over year.

Except for 22¢ higher in spot Apr, Live Cattle futures closed an average of 39¢ lower.

Except for 55¢ higher in spot May, Feeder Cattle futures closed an average of $1.48 lower.

Wholesale beef values were steady on Choice and lower on Select with light to moderate demand and moderate offerings, according to the Agricultural Marketing Service.

Choice boxed beef cutout value was 15¢ higher Monday afternoon at $233.14/cwt. Select was $1.69 lower at $217.72.

Corn futures closed mostly fractionally higher.

Soybean futures closed 6¢ to 7¢ lower.

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Major U.S. financial indices edged higher on Monday.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed 11 points higher. The S&P 500 closed 5 points higher. The NASDAQ was up 15 points.

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“With the exception of the cull cow market, cattle and beef markets are behaving seasonally with little underlying trend in most markets,” says Derrell Peel, Extension livestock marketing specialist at Oklahoma State University, in his weekly market comments. “All and all, we are seeing the most stable cattle and beef markets in many years. Until or unless outside shocks rise up to impact supply or demand conditions, expect cattle and beef markets to remain pretty calm in the coming months.”

Peel points out strong demand for grazing cattle kept calf and stocker prices near a seasonal peak through April. He believes prices are currently at or just past the seasonal peak.

“From a forage perspective, excellent moisture conditions suggest tremendous pasture and hay potential,” Peel says. “The latest Drought Monitor shows the least amount of dry conditions across the country since the Drought Monitor began in 2000. The upcoming May Crop Production report from USDA-NASS will likely show that May 1 hay stocks are low following reduced December 1 hay stocks and cold, wet conditions affecting cattle production this past winter. However, good hay production prospects for 2019 alleviate much of the concern about end of crop year stock levels as the 2019 hay crop year begins.”

Cattle Current Daily—Apr. 30, 2019 2019-04-29T19:37:00-05:00

Cattle Current Daily—Apr. 29, 2019

When all was said done last week, negotiated cash fed cattle prices were steady in the Southern Plains at $126/cwt., but $2-$3 less in the north at $125-$127 in Nebraska and $128 in the western Corn Belt. Dressed trade was $2-$3 lower at mostly $205 in Nebraska and mostly $205-$206 in the western Corn Belt.

Cattle futures edged mostly lower Friday, but apparent short covering and positioning helped staunch the downward momentum of the previous two sessions.

Except for 50¢ higher in spot Apr, Live Cattle futures closed an average of 32¢ lower.

Except for 40¢ higher in spot May and an average of 7¢ higher in the back two contracts, Feeder Cattle futures closed an average of 41¢ lower.

Wholesale beef values were steady on light to moderate demand and offerings, according to the Agricultural Marketing Service.

Choice boxed beef cutout value was 6¢ higher Friday afternoon at $232.99/cwt. Select was 34¢ lower at $219.41.

Corn futures closed 1¢ to 4¢ higher.

Soybean futures closed 4¢ to 5¢ lower.

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Major U.S. financial indices closed higher on Friday, buoyed by estimated GDP growth in the first quarter, which was more than expected.

Real Gross Domestic Product (GDP) increased 3.2% in the first quarter of this year, according to the advance estimate released by the Bureau of Economic Analysis. In the fourth quarter of 2018, real GDP increased 2.2%.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed 81 points higher. The S&P 500 closed 13 points higher. The NASDAQ was up 27 points.

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“I am optimistic that live and feeder markets will offer some correction to the sharp moves down, possibly if we see strong seasonal cattle and beef movements. But, the stronger than expected cattle market story might be over,” says Stephen Koontz, agricultural economist at Colorado State University, in the latest issue of In the Cattle Markets.

Although carcass weights continue lower than last year, at least for a while yet, and wholesale beef values appear ready for a seasonal surge, increasing cattle supplies will continue to weigh on prices through the summer.

“The inventory of market-ready cattle, as proxied by the calculated cattle on feed over 120 days, are nothing short of enormous,” Koontz says. “Orderly and aggressive marketings through the remainder of April, May, and June are essential.”

Cattle Current Daily—Apr. 29, 2019 2019-04-27T16:29:38-05:00

Cattle Current Daily—Apr. 26, 2019

Negotiated cash fed cattle trade was mostly $3 lower in Nebraska Thursday at mostly $127/cwt. Dressed trade was mostly $3 lower at mostly $205. Dressed sales were $2-$3 lower in the western Corn Belt at mostly $205-$206.

Pessimism began to build about looming cattle supplies as some funds began to unwind long positions. Technical pressure that began in Cattle futures the previous session found a new gear on Thursday, getting more fuel from limit-down moves in Lean Hog futures, which was tied to the lack of exports to China.

Live Cattle futures closed an average of $2.54 lower, for an average of about $4.50 lower in the last two sessions. 

Feeder Cattle futures closed an average of $3.27 lower, for an average of about $6 lower in the last two sessions.

Wholesale beef values were steady to weak on light to moderate demand and moderate to heavy offerings, according to the Agricultural Marketing Service.

Choice boxed beef cutout value was 3¢ lower Thursday afternoon at $232.93/cwt. Select was 53¢ lower at $219.75.

Corn futures closed 1¢ higher.

Soybean futures bounced back and closed 3¢ to 4¢ higher.

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Major U.S. financial indices closed mixed on Thursday. Despite mostly positive quarterly earnings reports, the main pressure was attributed to significantly lower 3M earnings than expected.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed 134 points lower. The S&P 500 closed 1 point lower. The NASDAQ was up 16 points.

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The latest monthly Livestock Slaughter report from USDA provides further overall perspective regarding the weather impact on carcass weights. 

Average dressed steer weight in March was 11 lbs. less year over year at 867 lbs.  For January-March it was 8 lbs. less at 878 lbs. Average dressed heifer weight was 13 lbs. less year over year at 807 lbs. It was 11 lbs. less for January to March at 817 lbs.

Keeping in mind one less business day in March this year, there were 1.22 million steers harvested under federal inspection in March, which was 105,900 head fewer (-7.9%) than the previous year. There were 42,900 more heifers slaughtered (+5.69%) at 797,300 head. Combined steer and heifer slaughter of 2.02 million head was 63,000 head fewer (-3.03%) than the previous March.

Total cattle slaughter under federal inspection of 2.61 million head in March were 51,100 fewer (-1.92%) than the prior year.

Total commercial beef production in March of 2.12 billion lbs. was 85.8 million lbs. less (-3.89%) year over year.

Total commercial red meat production was 86.8 million lbs. less (-1.92%) at 4.43 billion lbs.

Cattle Current Daily—Apr. 26, 2019 2019-04-25T21:43:46-05:00

Cattle Current Daily—Apr. 25, 2019

Cattle futures headed south Wednesday, amid presumable profit taking, technical pressure and chatter that the seasonal top in cash fed cattle prices is on the books.

Live Cattle futures closed an average of $1.99 lower ($1.50 to $2.77 lower), with the heaviest trade in a month. 

Feeder Cattle futures closed an average of $2.66 lower ($1.72 lower at the back to $3.10 lower in spot May).

Despite futures negativity, negotiated cash fed cattle trade was at steady money in the Southern Plains at $126/cwt. on moderate trade and demand. There were too few transactions to trend in other regions, but the tone of early sales was decidedly lower in Nebraska and the western Corn Belt.

There were 461 head offered in the weekly Fed Cattle Exchange Auction: 124 head (one lot of Kansas steers) sold for a weighted average price of $127, for delivery at 1-9 days.

Wholesale beef values were lower on light to moderate demand and moderate to heavy offerings, according to the Agricultural Marketing Service.

Choice boxed beef cutout value was $1.15 lower Wednesday afternoon at $232.96/cwt. Select was 98¢ lower at $220.28.

Corn futures closed 2¢ to 4¢ lower.

Soybean futures continued lower, closing down mostly 6¢ to 7¢.

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Major U.S. financial indices closed lower on Wednesday amid mixed quarterly earnings reports and more fretting about the trade impasse with China.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed 59 points lower. The S&P 500 closed 6 points lower. The NASDAQ was down 18 points.

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Nearly 150,000 growers in Iowa, Nebraska, Missouri and Kansas are affected by flooding, according to Farm Market iD (FMID), a provider of farm and grower data.

According to FMID, there are nearly 90,000 grain bins located in the flooded areas, which are valued at $4 billion for the structures. The 1.24 billion bu. of storage capacity in the affected area equates to 31% of on-farm grain storage.

“The amount and cost of lost grain and the construction costs to rebuild will impact farmers for years, and some may have a hard time recovering,” says Steve Rao, CEO of FMID. “That said, the majority of on-farm grain storage has not been affected.”

FMID estimates there are 16 million acres in the affected areas intended for planting to corn, wheat or soybeans.

Cattle Current Daily—Apr. 25, 2019 2019-04-24T20:00:43-05:00

Cattle Current Daily—Apr. 24, 2019

Cattle futures found some stability on Tuesday although Live Cattle edged lower, pressured in part by volatility in Lean Hog futures.

Live Cattle futures closed an average of 19¢ lower.

Except for $1.17 lower in spot May and 12¢ lower in Mar, Feeder Cattle futures closed an average of 18¢ higher.

Corn futures closed mostly 1¢ to 3¢ lower.

Soybean futures closed mostly 10¢ to 15¢ lower through Nov ’20 and then 3¢ to 9¢ lower. Apparently funds are taking advantage of the anemic fundamentals tied to bountiful supplies here and reports of a strong harvest in South America thus far.

Wholesale beef values were weak to lower on light to moderate demand and offerings, according to the Agricultural Marketing Service.

Choice boxed beef cutout value was 37¢ lower Tuesday afternoon at $234.11/cwt. Select was $1.38 lower at $221.26.

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Major U.S. financial indices closed strongly higher on Tuesday, buoyed by better than expected quarterly earnings from a wide array of companies, including Coca-Cola, Twitter and United Technologies.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed 145 points higher. The S&P 500 closed 25 points higher. The NASDAQ was up 105 points.

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Total pounds of beef in freezers Mar. 31 were 5% less than the previous month and 3% less than a year earlier, according to USDA’s monthly Cold Storage report.

Similarly, frozen pork supplies were down 1% from the previous month and down slightly from last year.

Total red meat supplies in freezers were 3% less than the previous month and 2% less than a year earlier.

Total frozen poultry supplies were also lower—1% less than the previous month and 2% less than a year ago.

Cattle Current Daily—Apr. 24, 2019 2019-04-23T21:45:51-05:00

Cattle Current Daily—Apr. 23, 2019

Feeder Cattle futures closed sharply lower Monday, in response to the higher than expected placements in last week’s Cattle on Feed report (see below). That, lower commodity markets overall and a pullback in Lean Hog futures helped drag down Live Cattle futures, despite last week’s firmer cash trade.

Except for 2¢ lower in spot Apr, Live Cattle futures closed an average of 97¢ lower.

Except for 65¢ higher in newly minted away Apr, Feeder Cattle futures closed an average of $1.23 lower.

Corn futures closed mostly 2¢ to 3¢ lower.

Soybean futures closed mostly 2¢ to 3¢ lower.

Wholesale beef values were higher on Choice and sharply higher on Select with moderate to good demand and light offerings, according to the Agricultural Marketing Service.

Choice boxed beef cutout value was 83¢ higher Monday afternoon at $234.48/cwt. Select was $2.15 higher at $222.64.

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Major U.S. financial indices mostly hovered in place Monday, with a bump in crude oil prices and energy stocks tempered by angst over the heart of quarterly earnings reporting this week.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed 48 points lower. The S&P 500 closed 2 points higher. The NASDAQ was up 17 points.

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Feedlot inventories are underscoring the dynamics of herd expansion, says Derrell Peel, Extension livestock marketing specialist at Oklahoma State University, in his weekly market comments.

“As of Apr. 1, Peel explains that In the five years of herd expansion from 2014 to 2018, heifers in feedlots averaged 34.4% of feedlot inventories. On Jan. 1 and Apr. 1 (this year), heifers accounted for 37.7% of feedlot inventories, indicating that heifer retention slowed significantly through 2018 coming into 2019.”

The data comes from the quarterly snapshot provided in Cattle on Feed reports.

Referring to the most recent one, Peel notes, besides cattle on feed Apr. 1 being record high for the month at 11.96 million head, the 12-month moving average of feedlot inventories is just shy of the record.

“Regional differences in on-feed inventories were pronounced and likely reflect the impacts of winter weather,” Peel says. “Feedlot inventories were up year over year in Texas (+6%); Colorado (+12%), Kansas (+2%) and Oklahoma (+2%). Feedlot totals were down year over year in Nebraska (-4%), Iowa (-4%) and South Dakota (-4%).

Cattle Current Daily—Apr. 23, 2019 2019-04-22T20:39:12-05:00

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This Sliding Bar can be switched on or off in theme options, and can take any widget you throw at it or even fill it with your custom HTML Code. Its perfect for grabbing the attention of your viewers. Choose between 1, 2, 3 or 4 columns, set the background color, widget divider color, activate transparency, a top border or fully disable it on desktop and mobile.

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This Sliding Bar can be switched on or off in theme options, and can take any widget you throw at it or even fill it with your custom HTML Code. Its perfect for grabbing the attention of your viewers. Choose between 1, 2, 3 or 4 columns, set the background color, widget divider color, activate transparency, a top border or fully disable it on desktop and mobile.