Cattle Current Daily—Nov. 1, 2021

Cattle Current Daily—Nov. 1, 2021

Negotiated cash fed cattle trade ranged from mostly inactive on light demand to a standstill through Friday afternoon, according to the Agricultural Marketing Service.

Live prices last week were $2 higher in the Southern Plains at $126/cwt., $2 higher in the western Corn Belt at $126-$127 and $2-$3 higher in Nebraska at $127. Dressed trade was $4 higher at $200.

Total estimated cattle slaughter last week was 668,000 head, which was 7,000 more than the previous week and 28,000 more than the same week last year. Total estimated year-to-date cattle slaughter of 27.60 million head was 847,000 head more (+3.17%) than the same time last year. Total estimated beef production of 22.83 billion lbs. was 616.2 million lbs. more (+2.77%) than a year earlier.

Cattle futures closed lower Friday, likely mostly due to week-end and month-end position squaring, given improving fundamentals.

Live Cattle futures closed an average of 94¢ lower, except for $2.87 higher in expiring Oct and 12¢ higher at the back.

Feeder Cattle futures closed an average of 96¢ lower (35¢ to $1.45 lower).

Corn futures closed 4¢ to 5¢ higher through near Jly and then mostly 1¢ higher.

Soybean futures closed 2¢ to 3¢ higher through Jan ‘23 and then mostly  fractionally higher to 1¢ higher.

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Major U.S. financial indices closed higher Friday, despite Apple and Amazon missing quarterly earnings estimates.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed 89 points higher. The S&P 500 closed 8 points higher. The NASDAQ closed 50 point higher.

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“It’s a challenging time for crop producers to manage input price risk. Input prices for fertilizer, crop protection (chemicals), machinery, fuel, labor, rent, and insurance are up substantially compared to last year at this time,” says Aaron Smith, crop marketing specialist at the University of Tennessee, in his weekly market comments. “Additionally, availability and timeliness of delivery are a major concern.”

Fertilizer prices underscore the dramatic increase in the cost of crop production.

“All three major nutrients—nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium—used in the production of primary row crops in the U.S. have experienced varying degrees of upward price pressure since late 2020,” say members of the Ag CEO Council (ACC). “Since mid-2020, nitrogen prices have climbed from approximately $450 per ton to $750 per ton, phosphorus prices from $400 per ton to more than $700 per ton and potassium prices from over $300 per ton to over $600 per ton.” That’s in a recent letter from the ACC to Michael Shapiro, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Economic Policy, in response to a request for comments to President Biden’s Executive Order on America’s Supply Chains.

According to the Ag CEO Council, supply chain disruptions, higher crop prices and escalating natural gas prices are all drivers of increasing fertilizer cost.

“The primary feedstock and process fuel for ammonia production is natural gas. The recent doubling of the Henry Hub natural gas price is increasing the cost of ammonia production – the building block for all nitrogen fertilizers,” according to the ACC letter.

ACC members explain multiple trade actions continue to affect both phosphorus and potassium prices. That includes U.S. tariffs on phosphorous imports from Morocco and Russia, in response to unfair subsidization from those countries, as well as China banning phosphorous exports through June of next year.

“Most common fertilizers have more than doubled compared to last year. As such, producers are seeking strategies to reduce input costs,” Smith says. “Two recommendations, as a starting point, are soil sampling (know what you’ve got) and crop selection (know current relative cost and revenue relationships for commodities produced on your farm). Unfortunately, there is no ‘silver bullet’ to mitigate rising input costs and availability concerns. So, producers will need to be creative in their approach and con-sider numerous strategies.”

2021-10-31T15:03:35-06:00

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