Cattle Current Daily—Apr. 29, 2020

Cattle Current Daily—Apr. 29, 2020

Volatility in negotiated cash fed cattle trade continues so far this week. Dressed prices were at $160/cwt. in the western Corn Belt Monday, then $150 on Tuesday with too few transactions to trend. Likewise, with too few transactions to trend early dressed sales in Nebraska were at $150, compared to $150-$160 the previous week.

Cattle futures edged higher Tuesday, making for a third consecutive session of mostly higher prices, underpinned by runaway wholesale beef values, while offering a glimmer of stability.

Live Cattle futures closed an average of 45¢ higher.

Except for 77¢ lower in spot Apr, Feeder Cattle futures closed an average of 67¢ higher.

Wholesale beef values continued to shatter records Tuesday.

Choice boxed beef cutout value was $18.98 higher Tuesday afternoon at a $330.82/cwt. Select was $22.10 higher at $320.88.

According to various news reports, President Trump was close to signing an executive order, utilizing the Defense Production Act to mandate packing plants remain open, in order to protect the nation’s food supply (see below).

Other than 2¢ lower and 1¢ lower in the front two contracts, Corn futures closed mainly fractionally higher to 2¢ higher.

Soybean futures closed 1¢ to 4¢ lower through Nov ’20 and then 3¢ to 8¢ higher.

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Major U.S. financial indices softened Tuesday. Pressure appeared to include skittishness over the Fed meeting Wednesday, as well as declining consumer confidence.

The Conference Board Consumer Confidence Index® declined 31.9 points from March to April to 86.9, according to The Conference Board (TCB). Although the Present Situation Index–based on consumers’ assessment of current business and labor market conditions–declined from 166.7 to 76.4, the Expectations Index–based on consumers’ short-term outlook for income, business and labor market conditions–improved from 86.8 in March to 93.8 in April.

“The 90-point drop in the Present Situation Index, the largest on record, reflects the sharp contraction in economic activity and surge in unemployment claims brought about by the COVID-19 crisis,” explains Lynn Franco, TCB Senior Director of Economic Indicators. “Short-term expectations for the economy and labor market improved, likely prompted by the possibility that stay-at-home restrictions will loosen soon, along with a re-opening of the economy. However, consumers were less optimistic about their financial prospects and this could have repercussions for spending as the recovery takes hold.”

The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed 32 points lower. The S&P 500 closed 15 points lower. The NASDAQ closed 122 points lower.

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“In small communities around the country where we employ over 100,000 hard-working men and women, we’re being forced to shutter our doors. This means one thing–the food supply chain is vulnerable,” says John Tyson, Chairman of the Board for Tyson Foods, in a letter published as an ad in Sunday’s New York Times and other newspapers. “As pork, beef and chicken plants are being forced to close, even for short periods of time, millions of pounds of meat will disappear from the supply chain. As a result, there will be limited supply of our products available in grocery stores until we are able to reopen our facilities that are currently closed.”

The United Food and Commercial Workers International Union (UFCW) estimates 22 meat packing plants closed–including union and non-union plants–at some point in the past two months. Closures reduced pork slaughter by 25% and beef slaughter by 10%, according to the organization.

“UFCW estimates have confirmed 20 worker deaths in meatpacking and food processing. In addition, at least 5,000 meatpacking workers and 1,500 food processing workers have been directly impacted by the virus,” according to a UFCW news release published Monday. “Those directly impacted include individuals who have tested positive for COVID-19, missed work due to self-quarantine, are awaiting test results, or have been hospitalized, and/or are symptomatic.”

“Tyson and every company across this vital industry, must immediately join with UFCW in calling for federal and state elected leaders to designate these frontline workers as first responders,” said UFCW International President Marc Perrone, in a Tuesday statement. “Temporary first responder status ensures these workers have priority access to the COVID-19 testing and protective equipment they need to continue doing these essential jobs. Our federal leaders must enforce clear guidelines to ensure every employer lives up to the high safety standards these workers deserve and the American people expect.”

“We have a responsibility to feed our country. It is as essential as healthcare. This is a challenge that should not be ignored,” explained Tyson, in his letter. “Our plants must remain operational so that we can supply food to our families in America. This is a delicate balance because Tyson Foods places team member safety as our top priority…The government bodies at the national, state, county and city levels must unite in a comprehensive, thoughtful and productive way to allow our team members to work in safety without fear, panic or worry.”

2020-04-28T19:49:06-05:00

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